Dating violece

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Written By: Anna Rafferty, college student writer Reviewed By: Nancy Brown, Ph. Last Reviewed: October 2013Sources: Below are links PAMF accessed when researching this topic.

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REACH also provides youth-focused community prevention programs through our Peers Against Violenc E (PAVE) program.

PAVE helps youth develop healthy relationships and practice supportive communication skills, engages youth and invested adults as active bystanders in identifying and responding to dating violence, and fosters youth leadership skills.

Alarmingly, research indicates that only 33% of teens in abusive relationships have reported their experiences to anyone.

Of those teen survivors, 3% of teens in abusive relationships reported the abuse to authority figures and 6% told family members. Studies show that teens experiencing abuse are more likely to smoke or use drugs, take diet pills/laxatives, engage in risky sexual behaviors, and attempt or consider suicide. Teens experiencing abuse are usually silent about their experience; often, teens blame themselves or normalize abusive behaviors as typical.

There are specific warning signs that may indicate your teen is in an abusive relationship.

It is a way of controlling another person, and even abuse that doesn't leave physical marks can have profound emotional consequences and put the person being abused in danger.

Welcome to one of the most challenging phases of parenting—adolescence.

In all likelihood, your young teen is experiencing significant emotional, psychological and physical changes.

Dating violence is a type of domestic violence that happens between people in a close relationship.

Dating violence often starts with small acts, like teasing and name-calling.

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